Walker Evans Photography

Walker Evans

American (1903-1975)

WALKER EVANS, Mining Camp Residents, Morgantown, West Virginia], 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 6 3/8” x 8 3/8”

WALKER EVANS, Mining Camp Residents, Morgantown, West Virginia], 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 6 3/8” x 8 3/8”

WALKER EVANS, Three Members of a Prison Work Gang, possibly Louisiana, 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 5 1/2" x 7 7/8"

WALKER EVANS, Three Members of a Prison Work Gang, possibly Louisiana, 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 5 1/2″ x 7 7/8″

WALKER EVANS, Seed Store Interior, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1936, silver print, printed ca. 1936, 9 3/4” x 7 5/8”

WALKER EVANS, Seed Store Interior, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 1936, silver print, printed ca. 1936, 9 3/4” x 7 5/8”

WALKER EVANS, "Sidewalk In Mississippi, 1936", Vicksburg, 1936, silver print, printed later, 8" x 9 15/16"

WALKER EVANS, “Sidewalk In Mississippi, 1936″, Vicksburg, 1936, silver print, printed later, 8″ x 9 15/16”

WALKER EVANS, Street Scene, Bethlehem, PA, 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 6 1/2" x 9 1/2"

WALKER EVANS, Street Scene, Bethlehem, PA, 1935, silver print, printed ca. 1935, 6 1/2″ x 9 1/2″

WALKER EVANS, “A Sharecropper’s Yard,” Hale County Alabama, Summer 1936, 1936, silver print, printed circa 1936, 5 5/8” x 8 5/16”

WALKER EVANS, “A Sharecropper’s Yard,” Hale County Alabama, Summer 1936, 1936, silver print, printed circa 1936, 5 5/8” x 8 5/16”

WALKER EVANS, “Stove, Heliker House, Cranberry Island, Maine”, 1969, silver print, printed ca. 1969, 12 15/16” x 8 13/16”

WALKER EVANS, “Stove, Heliker House, Cranberry Island, Maine”, 1969, silver print, printed ca. 1969, 12 15/16” x 8 13/16”

WALKER EVANS, Breakfast Room at Belle Grove Plantation, White Chapel, Louisiana, 1935, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 10 1/8” x 12 13/16”

WALKER EVANS, Breakfast Room at Belle Grove Plantation, White Chapel, Louisiana, 1935, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 10 1/8” x 12 13/16”

WALKER EVANS, Kitchen Wall, Alabama Farmstead, 1936, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 9 7/16” x 11 15/16”

WALKER EVANS, Kitchen Wall, Alabama Farmstead, 1936, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 9 7/16” x 11 15/16”

WALKER EVANS, Penny Picture Display, Savannah, Georgia, 1936, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 12 13/16” x 10 5/16”

WALKER EVANS, Penny Picture Display, Savannah, Georgia, 1936, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 12 13/16” x 10 5/16”

WALKER EVANS, Saratoga Springs, New York, 1931, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 11 11/16” x 9 7/16”

WALKER EVANS, Saratoga Springs, New York, 1931, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 11 11/16” x 9 7/16”

WALKER EVANS, Main Street, Ossining, New York, 1932, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 6 7/16” x 9 3/4”

WALKER EVANS, Main Street, Ossining, New York, 1932, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 6 7/16” x 9 3/4”

WALKER  EVANS, “Barber Shop, New Orleans”, 1935, silver print; printed 1971, 9 3/8” x 7 9/16”

WALKER EVANS, “Barber Shop, New Orleans”, 1935, silver print; printed 1971, 9 3/8” x 7 9/16”

WALKER EVANS, Lunchroom Buddies, New York City, 1931, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 11 15/16” x 9 1/4”

WALKER EVANS, Lunchroom Buddies, New York City, 1931, silver print, printed 1974, ed. 75, 11 15/16” x 9 1/4”

Biography | Bibliography

Evans dropped out of college in 1926 and went to Paris, where he developed an interest in literature. He returned to the United States in 1927 and found himself alienated from American society and its mores. In turning to photography, he was influenced by Flaubert’s attitude that the artist should be invisible but all-powerful, and he reacted against the pictorialism then in vogue.

He moved toward a clear, straightforward, “truthful” style. In John Szarkowski’s words: “He thought of photography as a way of preserving segments out of time itself, without regard for the conventional structures of picture-building. Nothing was to be imposed on experience; the truth was to be discovered, not constructed”.

In the mid-1930s, Evans made photographs for the Farm Security Administration (FSA). After 1938 and through the fifties he photographed increasingly in the subways, in the streets, and from moving trains. During this period he also wrote for Time magazine (1943-1945) and wrote and photographed for Fortune (1945-1965). When, in later years, he returned to the more formal style of his youth, the images were more personal and autobiographical.

John R. Gossage, describing Evans as “an artist who hides his hand,” wrote: “Evans’s work, even on a casual reading, consists of facts immediately present to the attention. There are no overt references to symbolism or metaphor, no reaching for drama or art, yet all these are achieved. These remarkable photographs coerce, persuade, not to a point of view, but to a deeply felt conviction that these pictured things really did exist – they really looked like that – on that day…. But don’t let these photographs fool you.

There is nothing simple about being this direct, nothing casual about the plainness of these scenes and, most importantly, there is nothing detached for sentimental in this quiet passion. When you start to examine the trick these photographs have played on you – inducing you to believe that the photograph presents the scene ‘ the way it really was’ – a certain complex balance begins to assert itself: intelligence, and, more importantly, passion have allowed the images just the proper amount of space to complete the illusion, while at the same time being sufficiently expressive to sustain their maker. This result can only be achieved by a photographer with the kind of unalterable assurance in command of his art which enables him to permit something merely to be while simultaneously retaining involvement and kinship with it” (14 American Photographers catalogue, p. 11, listed in chapter 7).”1

1 From Lee D. Witkin, and Barbara London, Selected Photographers: A Collector’s Compendium, The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1979, 135.

Bibliography

Andrei Codrescu, Walker Evans: Signs, Christopher Hudson, 1998.

Peter Galassi, Walker Evans and Company, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2000.

Michael Brix, Birgit Mayer, Walker Evans, America, Rizzoli, 1990.

Jeff L. Rosenheim, Douglas Eklund, Unclassified: A Walker Evans Anthology, Scalo Zurich in association with The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1998.

Rodger Kingston, Walker Evans in Print: An Illustrated Bibliography, R.P. Kingston Photographs, 1995.

Lesley K. Baier, Walker Evans at Fortune, 1945-1965, Wellesley College Museum, 1977.

Gilles Mora, John T. Hill, Walker Evans The Hungry Eye, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1993.

Judith Keller, Walker Evans: The Getty Museum Collection, The J. Paul Getty Museum, 1995.

Lincoln Kirstein, Walker Evans: American Photographs, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 1938.

Ellen Fleurov, Walker Evans: Simple Secrets, Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1997.

Jerry L. Thompson, Walker Evans at Work, Harper & Row, 1982.

Jerald C. Maddox, Walker Evans: Photographs for the Farm Security Administration, 1935-1938, Da Capo Press, Inc., 1973.

Sarah Greenough, Walker Evans: Subways and Streets, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 1991.

Robert Plunket, Walker Evans: Florida, J. Paul Getty Museum, 2000.

Belinda Rathbone, Walker Evans: A Biography, Houghton Mifflin Company, 1995.

Gilles Mora, John T. Hill, Walker Evans: Havana 1933, Pantheon Books, 1989.

John T. Hill, Alan Trachtenberg, Walker Evans: Lyric Documentary, Steidl Publishers, Gottingen, Germany, 2006.