George Barnard Photography

George Barnard

American (1819-1902)

GEORGE BARNARD, “Rebel Works in Front of Atlanta, GA. No. 2”, 1865, albumen print, 10” x 13 7/8”

GEORGE BARNARD, “Rebel Works in Front of Atlanta, GA. No. 2”, 1865, albumen print, 10” x 13 7/8”

GEORGE BARNARD, “Rebel Works in Front of Atlanta, GA., No 4”, 1864, albumen print, 10” x 14”

GEORGE BARNARD, “Rebel Works in Front of Atlanta, GA., No 4”, 1864, albumen print, 10” x 14”

GEORGE BARNARD , Confederate Fortifications in Front of Atlanta, West Side - Looking South East, 1864, albumen print, 10 1/2” x 15”

GEORGE BARNARD , Confederate Fortifications in Front of Atlanta, West Side – Looking South East, 1864, albumen print, 10 1/2” x 15”

GEORGE BARNARD, “Columbia from the Capitol”, 1865, albumen print, 10” x 14”

GEORGE BARNARD, “Columbia from the Capitol”, 1865, albumen print, 10” x 14”

Biography | Bibliography

“During the Civil War George Barnard did photographic work for the Union Army. His usual assignments probably consisted of copying maps and plans, but he also took a number of photographs in the field. In Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign he published photographs that he made along the route followed by General Sherman’s army on its campaign at the end of the war and on its famous March to the Sea. E. and H. T. Anthony published some of George Barnard’s stereo views, Harper’s Weekly used his photographs as the basis for line engravings, and several photographs that he made with James F. Gibson were published in Gardner’s Photographic Sketch Book of the War.

The complexities of the wet-plate process made it all but impossible to photograph during actual battles; George Barnard usually worked far behind the front lines photographing bridges, railroads, and other engineering installations; famous battle sites; informal scenes with soldiers; as well as the devastation and ruins left by the war. His views of battlefields taken long after the soldiers had gone are as carefully composed as still lifes; their quietness contrasts with the viewer’s mental image of what must have happened there. Dramatic clouds added from a second negative during printing are characteristic of Barnard’s work.”1

1From Lee D. Witkin, and Barbara London, Selected Photographers: A Collector’s Compendium,”The Photograph Collector’s Guide, Boston: New York Graphic Society, 1979, 78.

Bibliography

David Acton, Photography at the Worcester Art Museum: Keeping Shadows, Ghent, Netherlands: Snoeck Publishers, 2004.

George N. Barnard, Photographic Views of Sherman’s Campaign, Mineola, NY: Dover Publications, Inc., 1977.

William C. Davis, Touched by Fire: A Photographic Portrait of the Civil War, Vol. 1, Boston: Little, Brown and Company, 1985.

Keith F. Davis, George N. Barnard: Photographer of Sherman’s Campaign, Kansas City: Hallmark Cards, Inc., 1990.

Susan Faxon, Addison Gallery of American Art: 65 Years, Andover, MA: Addison Gallery, 1996.

Peter Galassi, Before Photography: Painting and the Invention of Photography, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1981.

Deborah Gribbon, Masterpieces of the J. Paul Getty Museum: Photographs, Los Angeles: The J. Paul Getty Museum, 1999.

Richard Pare, Photography and Architecture: 1839-1939, Montreal: Canadian Centre for Architecture, 1982.

John Szarkowski, Looking at Photographs, New York: Museum of Modern Art, 1973.

Bob Zeller, William A. Frassanito, Catalogue of Photographic Incidents of the War From the Gallery of Alexander Gardner, Photographer to the Army of the Potomac, Corner of 7th and D Streets, Washington D.C., Tampa, FL: Center for Civil War Photography, 2003.